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Divorce law blog

Divorce and the new Stamp Duty regime – what does it mean for home buyers/sellers?


17/12/2014   By: Alex Round
Many people who are in the process of getting divorced in the UK will be selling and/or buying a property as a result. The recently announced changes to the Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) regime are therefore important to understand.

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Top 10 tips for separated or divorced parents for sorting out the Christmas arrangements for the kids


09/12/2014   By: Rose-Marie Drury
We know from our experience as family lawyers that Christmas can be a really difficult time for separated families. Sorting out how the children spend time with both sides of the family is more likely than not going to an emotional issue for any parent. It’s likely to be in your children’s best interests that if possible you agree contact in advance rather than going to court so this December we’ve put together our 10 top tips for sorting out Christmas arrangements.

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The right of grandparents to see their grandchildren


01/12/2014   By: Andrew Moore
It should not be forgotten that when a relationship breaks down children may not only lose contact with a parent, but also with their grandparents. With two working parent families now the norm and the high cost of child care, grandparents are regularly called upon to assist the young family and can become part of a child’s routine at an early age. Children form their key relationships in their first few years of life and maintaining contact with key adults such as grandparents is important in providing children with stability during a difficult transition in their lives.

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Impact of separation/divorce on work


27/11/2014   By: Rebecca Lang
Coming to terms with the breakdown of a relationship is a difficult and emotional time for anyone. The impact that the divorce or separation process has on your personal life can also affect you in the workplace. Your relationships with colleagues can suffer as can your ability to focus on the job. Research commissioned by Resolution, the national organisation of family lawyers dedicated to promoting a non-confrontational, constructive approach to resolving family disputes, shows that one in ten people have had to leave their job after a separation or worked with a colleague who has had to leave for that reason. The process can also take its toll on your health and lead to periods of absence. 16% of the people surveyed said either they or a colleague has had to take sick leave as a direct result of the breakdown of a relationship. If you hold a senior position in your organisation, this can cause disruption and may have an effect on morale within your team. You may become more reliant on colleagues for emotional support and reassurance and this may in turn impact on their productivity. 15% of those surveyed identified divorce as having a negative impact on productivity in their workplace and 34% said that more needed to be done by employers to provide additional support.

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What is a MIAM?


25/11/2014   By: Jane Booth
“MIAM” stands for Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting. It is a meeting where a mediator will provide you with information on mediation and other ways to resolve the issues arising from your separation or divorce. The mediator will discuss with you whether mediation or another form of family dispute resolution is suitable for you given your particular circumstances. The focus is on trying to keep things out of court.

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Presumption of parental involvement in a child's life is due to come into effect on 22 October 2014


30/10/2014   By: Nicola Rowlings
Last week, the new presumption for parental involvement contained in Section 11 of the Children and Families Act 2002 came into force. On the face of it, it sounds as though this could be a fundamental shift in the law relating to the arrangements for the time the children spend with their parents on separation and divorce, but opinion is divided as to whether, in fact, this will lead to a significant change.

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The Myth of the “Quickie” Divorce


16/10/2014   By: Jane Booth
The press often refers to so-called “quickie” divorces and websites are even marketing themselves as being set up to provide them. There is, however, no such thing as a “quickie” divorce. The process is the same for all undefended divorces in England and Wales.

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Backdating marriage certificates for couples converting civil partnerships into marriage


08/10/2014   By: Nigel Shepherd
Although same sex couples became able to marry at the end of March 2014 in England and Wales, there was a glaring anomaly, because those couples who had already entered into a civil partnership, were not able to convert that civil partnership into a marriage. The regulations providing the legal framework for conversion had not been sorted out.

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Location, location, location


06/10/2014   By: Nicola Rowlings
There can be no denying that, since 2000 (and particularly over the past decade), London has developed a reputation for being the so-called “divorce capital of the world” - a mecca for divorce tourists if you like. In 2012, The Times reported that 1 in 6 divorce cases in London involved a foreign national, half of the “big money” divorces involved people from abroad and that there had been a significant increase in international couples seeking pre-nuptial agreements to protect their wealth in the event of a divorce.

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The Scottish Referendum – what happens if Scotland “divorces” the UK?


18/09/2014   By: Sue Brookes
Those in the “No” camp have made it clear that a yes vote today will mean a divorce for Scotland and the rest of the UK and that it will not simply be a trial separation. A permanent separation will inevitably have a huge impact on all aspects of political and economic life, but what impact will it have on the laws surrounding family separation and breakdown?

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